Friday, April 4, 2014

Major Pope Francis Reveal

Here at EWTN is an article that is exactly the sort of thing we need. The philosopher who gave Pope Francis his world view. The book The Pope and the Philosopher describes Jorge Bergoglio's close friendship with the Uruguayan philosopher Methol Ferre.

Ferre was the son of an agnostic who was converted to Christianity at the age of 19. He became the co-editor of a magazine that covered the Latin American revolution scene. He rejected Marxist Liberation Theology, and adopted the Liberation Theology of Argentine pastor Lucio Gera. This emphasized the religion of the people, the poor, and Latin American history.

The EWTN article doesn't mention it, but he seems to have been active in leftist politics, and described himself as a Peronist whose entire life was shaped by a 1953 speech of Peron's. He wrote that evangelization should not take second place to liberation, but was the source of liberation, the two being inseparable. This position was not popular with everyone. More radical theologians saw it as an effort by "conservatives" to neuter liberation theology. He was a lay advisor to Latin American bishops, and was decorated by the Argentine government.

Ferre's own philosophy is described as a mix of liberalism and a theology of the people.

When Pope Francis received a copy of the book from Uruguay's president, he said the philosopher "had taught us how to think."

Vatican expert Sandro Magister, writing in L'Espresso on March 31, said this:
“There is a stunning harmony between this vision of Methol Ferré and the program of his disciple Bergoglio's pontificate,” Magister wrote: “with his rejection of the disjointed transmission of a multitude of doctrines to be imposed with insistence and with his insistence on a Church capable of 'making the heart burn,' of healing every kind of illness and injury, of restoring happiness.”
Funny how the Bear has been writing that Pope Francis seems to be on a different wavelength from most Catholics. This would be expected if he has a unique and peculiarly Latin American perspective, if he is repelled by what he views as a cold European Catholicism defined by duties and doctrines and formalities. Does this fit everything we've witnessed?

Now, you could write all the Bear knows about Latin America on the head of a pin with a crayon. Perpetual revolution, corrupt governments, Fr. Kalashnikov, and, yes liberation theology, even Marxism. That's what comes to mind, anyway. (Okay, llamas.) But he does know two things.

We've never had a pope from there before, and it's the South, not West. These two facts are so blindingly obvious the Bear never dared to submit they might explain everything.

3 comments:

  1. This article is the first thing that I have read that begins to explain our new Bishop of Rome, and his roots. Thank you. Here's something interesting I found about Lucio Gera. Gera died in August of 2012 in Buenos Aires. At the request of Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio he was buried in the otherwise reserved for the bishops crypt of the Cathedral of Buenos Aires. That decision caused a stir and was seen in Argentina as a sign of appreciation Bergoglios the "Church of the poor". This

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  2. Fr. Gera was a member of the movement "Priests for the Third World"
    he began teaching courses to liberation theology in 1972, in Buenos Aires.

    Another interesting fact is Fr. Gera was born in Paisano, Italy and immigrated with his family to Argentina.

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  3. This was a REMARKABLE post and tied many loose ends together for me. I had read "The Jesuits" this past January and it shed much light for me on the psychology behind the current BofR's otherwise incomprehensible words and actions; this however fills in soem remaining gaps. Again, SO GLAD I found this site!!! God bless you and your work.

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