Saturday, October 24, 2015

Oh No! We Won!

BREAKING -- Synod report out: liberals defeated and conservative bloggers delete thousands of articles announcing the end of the Catholic Church.

The Telegraph. "Synod Verdict: the Catholic Church is still Catholic. Liberals need to back off and traditionalists can calm down. The synod upheld Catholic doctrine and the future rests with orthodoxy." [A+]

The Advocate. "Disappointment, yet hope remains." [Coincidentally, last entry in Hitler's diary.]

The Guardian. "Vatican synod holds it's line on gay couples, but offers new hope to Catholic divorcees." [Church to stop hanging them?]

New York Times. "Vatican splits on rules over a more inclusive Church." [LOL]

The Synod labored and brought forth a mouse, but we shall see. Pope Francis could say, "Oh well, so much for collegiality," and marry two priests in front of the Bernini baldachin in St. Peter's next week. That's what makes being Catholic so exciting!

The Church is like Gotham City, with all the same colorful troublemakers hatching their schemes, but good always manages to triumph in the end. This time, the Joker: Cardinal Kasper with his trademark gap-toothed rictus; Bane: the bald and bulky Cardinal Marx; Poison Ivy: the, well, Fr. Rosica (the Bear is totally not implying that, despite Fr. Rosica's well-known fondness for homosexuals, Fr. Rosica is in drag or is himself a homosexual); The Penguin: Cardinal Cupich; and Catwoman: Cardinal Daneels. (Feel free to add your own.)

And, silhouetted against a full moon, standing atop Gotham Cookie Factory, is the rotund figure of The Bear.

46 comments:

  1. The whole point of the exercise was to produce mushy gobbledygook. That they did. That is what modernists do. It is not a clear, rousing defense of family and sexual ethics as defined by the Magisterium. Nor is it a heretical screed that attempts to open a path to perverted sin in the Sanctuary of God. It is a Modernist piece of confusion that can be used as a Rorschach test to accomplish whatever the busy little bees desire. No one really knows what it means. Everyone has a unique explanation for what they think it means. The work goes on behind the scenes.

    Liberals defeated? No, not really. They are n this for the long-haul and this piece of confusion will serve just fine.

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  2. I nominate the Pope for "Two-Face." Wikipedia sez: "writers have portrayed his obsession with duality and fate as the result of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dissociative identity disorder. He obsessively makes all important decisions by flipping a two-headed coin, one side defaced."

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  3. I am afraid we are in for much more disappointment from all appearances. The Pope is fully engaged in his divisive mission to effectively destroy the Catholic Church. He will lose. But many will be lost in the process.
    St Michael the Archangel defend us .................

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  4. No, I don't think we won. Communion for adulterers and the celebration of homosex were put on the table and they were not condemned.

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  5. Indeed Michael, this is not even really a bump in the road for the heretics, they are still busy conniving and planning on how to 'create their new version of Church'. They are in it for the long haul is correct. This business about 'hurrah!!! We WON!!! is so totally a view that some have through rose colored glasses, that don't really understand what makes these people tick. BTW, the Pope's ending comments sound a little to me like a rant from someone who didn't get everything he wanted. A bit of a poke in the eye to traditional Catholics, but by now everyone should be used to that. To tell you the truth, I'm kind of already numb to his insults. Keep praying all for the Church of Christ including the Pope.

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  6. Come on, people, you would have given your right arms for this six months ago when gay unions, polygamy, communion for divorced and remarried and practicing homosexuals were all being seriously proposed. This is what a win looks like. You will never again see a 1950 Church. The "Novus Ordo" liturgy will always be the liturgy of the Church by a huge majority. We are locked in combat with Modernism, and will be for generations. They made a bold play here with the POPE behind them, and, like the Gunpowder Plot, it ended not with a bang, but with a whimper.

    If you can't bring yourselves to call it a win, at least concede it was a defeat. But, the Bear never wastes a word. The past about Gotham City has a point. Batman never finally defeats corruption and evil. You don't get to enjoy that moment in the Church, in this world, either. You fight the battles as they come. In the end the Church ALWAYS depends on the good actions of wise men and women, aided by the Holy Spirit. Satan, or real enemy, will not give up until the crack of doom.

    Modernism was dealt a severe blow when it seemed to hold all the cards: a favorable media; homosexuals at their peak of popularity and power; men like "Dear Reinhard" Cardinal Marx and Cardinal Kasper installed in the Pope's inner circle; rules favoring them; and, most of all, a Pope who was orchestrating the Modernist campaign.

    Yet we had more good bishops than we thought. And people saying rosaries. Call it what you want, but Modernists and their fellow travelers cried themselves to sleep last night.

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    Replies
    1. Totally in agreement with you. We won a massive victory. Of course the battle goes on and we must remain vigilant but we have much to be thankful for today.

      Delete
    2. Wise words, Bear. Wise words.

      Delete
  7. We won for the moment. Evil never sleeps.

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  8. "Confederate forces defeated at Gettysburg, but since the Confederacy did not surrender, President Lincoln refuses to call the battle a victory."

    Don't set the bar so high that anything short of crushing Modernism and it's complete extermination must be met with gloom. Please don't caricaturize me saying "we won," as the second A-Bomb at Japan and signing the surrender on USS Missouri. Not only do we still have work to do, but we'll always have work to do. V-Earth day comes when Jesus returns. But this is a battle we won. There will be others. It is healthy to recognize and be grateful to God when he hands us a victory. Frankly, I am troubled by the apparent lack of that gratitude and pray God does not hold it against us. Please, think, visitors, friends and woodland creatures.

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  9. In previous Councils, Church Fathers fought cover every word, phrase, punctuation mark. They knew defense against future heresy depended on precise attention to detail. That attention was lacking in this document for sure, but it also contains clear doctrinal alterations. I don't see what's so great about passages like this:

    ......... "Finally, there are those who have entered into a second union for the sake of the children's upbringing, and who are sometimes subjectively certain in conscience that their previous and irreparably destroyed marriage had never been valid." (FC, 84) It is therefore a duty of the priests to accompany the interested parties on the path of discernment according to the teaching of the Church and the orientations of the Bishop. In this process, it will be useful to make an examination of conscience, by way of moments of reflection and repentance.Remarried divorcees should ask themselves how they behaved themselves when their conjugal union entered in crisis; if there were attempts at reconciliation; what is the situation of the abandoned partner ["partner" in the original Italian]; what consequences the new relationship has on the rest of the family and in the community of the faithful; what example does it offer to young people who are to prepare themselves to matrimony. A sincere reflection may reinforce trust in the mercy of God that is not denied to anyone." .........

    In the age of expedited annulments, this is a victory for Sacramental Marriage? This passage is confusing, but if you unpack it, there are clear theological changes therein, (e.g. "subjectively certain in conscience" for one example). I wish I shared your confidence, but I just don't.

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    Replies
    1. Where did you get "confidence?" I never said anything but that this is a victory! Not the final victory! Those keys are pretty big. I believe the Church has a lot of discretion in dealing with matters such as these. The Church is not going to contradict the words of Jesus. Do you believe the Church can forgive sins? Do you believe the Church has authority to determine the parameters and requirements off that God-given ministry. I think the Church may or may not move along these lines. I don't know. Depending on how they handle it, it might not be an excuse for schism, but some bloggers had already figured out how the "spiritual authority of the Church" would simply move to the SSPX, leaving the "institutional Church" to wither away.

      Note, I an not saying a move on divorce would be a good idea. I'm just saying that we should see what develops before getting all upset.

      The answer might be nothing. Kinda like this huge, embarrassing Turkish seal show Pope Francis put on before all the world LOL

      And note the headline. I knew how people were going to react ;-)

      Delete
  10. Bear, I absolutely agree with your analysis. When did we become so set in our own vision of doom and gloom that we mock the confirmation that this continues to be the Church which was established by Christ, and not by us? This outcome should be a humbling experience and an indictment of our lack of trust in the promised working of the Holy Spirit. For all of our previous angst, I see this as a reminder of the advice of St. Padre Pio, "Pray, hope and don't worry." Perhaps we need to reconsider Jesus' admonition in Matthew 10:16: “Behold, I am sending you out as sheep in the midst of wolves, so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves." For myself, I admit my attitude has been neither wise nor innocent.

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    Replies
    1. Comment of the day! I don't want to make anyone angry, but it seems that some Catholics are so invested in disappointment and failure they are psychologically incapable of accepting good news. And it's still going to be the hatred "Novus Ordo Church" anyway, so how can anything be a victory? They'll go over each paragraph with a magnifying glass looking for things to be angry at. They may tend generally toward perfectionism, or it may be limited to matters like these, but unless it's PERFECT, perfect, I tell you, it means NOTHING.

      Maybe it's my military or legal background, but in the real world we recognize perfect is the enemy of good enough.

      And when did this synod become the final showdown when Modernism was to be 100% defeated or it would be counted as a loss!??! Moving the goal post after the fact much? If I had predicted this outcome six months ago, oh the hoots and cries to take off my rose colored glasses, and find my way out of neo-Catholic Happy Land! You know it's the truth.

      Well, there's some ambiguous language. Ya think? That's the way the Church talks now, and nothing you do is going to turn the clock back to 1563! But I'm talking into the wind, I know, so I'll shut up. Enjoy your defeat. I'm enjoying guinea pig kabobs with honey sauce, some nice Korbinian's doppelbock, and fireworks. The enemy has been demoralized and discredited. With the POPE behind them! No wonder Pope Francis wasn't his usual jolly self.

      We could follow up this victory with a new offensive, or we could listen to the Tokyo Rose crew who want everyone's moral to be as low as theirs. The Bear hopes everyone joins him so we have the psychological edge when the next battle comes. If we had half the determination and psychological toughness as our enemies...

      Delete
    2. As I commented in your "A Bear's Confession" post, I applaud your decision to "Counsel the Doubtful, Comfort the Afflicted, and Fish". It's very important not to feed despair and agitate catholics about things they can do nothing about.

      But I see in some of your language in recent posts and here, too far of a swing of the pendulum. There's a delicate balance of stating there's a crushing crisis in the Church on the one hand, and reaffirming the lived duty of the laity to tend to their duty in life and maintain the Faith where they are at--while leaving the Church in the hands of God.

      No easy task! And what you're experiencing as a blogger coming from a readership that was attracted to a more cynical appraisal and now trying to keep the "woodland creatures" on board is probably not too far from what pastors experience in trying to maintain some unity within a parish.

      How does one analyze this Synod? Is it a progressive rout of the orthodox? No. Is it an orthodox rout of the progressives? No. Is it a "victory"? Is it a defeat? No and No.

      So what is it? You have to listen to what the enemies of the Church say. Not the ignorant media, but rather the internal enemies. Kasper says in an interview that he's pleased with the outcome. That is, there has been an advance on the front of language. Exactly where incremental progress is made by progressives. They never give on ground won.

      So, you have the unenviable task of not feeding despair, yet recognizing an advance in exploitable language. But you can't completely shrug your shoulders either simply because there's no clear winners. After all the essence of the issue is lack of clarity.

      ["If we had half the determination and psychological toughness as our enemies..."
      More accurately, "spiritual toughness".]

      Welcome to Mission Impossible....Good luck Jim.

      Delete
  11. Well this is good news. I don't have to worry about my sin living in sin with his girlfriend. Their co-habitation is merely a 'path of growth' according to the synod.

    Seattle kim

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  12. Here is a good reason for pessimism. Francis has yet to issue a document from this synod. He can pull the "Chair of Peter" move when it suits him, and it will here. Francis is angry at conservatives/traditionalists.

    Fr Z has filed this analysis from a well-informed source. It ain't over yet.
    http://wdtprs.com/blog/2015/10/what-did-the-synod-really-say-some-analysis-of-the-final-report/

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  13. I think you've been snookered. Time will tell won't it? Pretty serious stuff we're dealing with here. Celebrate if you want, but I'll continue watching closely with a very jaundiced eye. Souls are at stake, including my own and my precious family's. I'll just have a small bowl of cold gruel and moldy bread, and then go back to watching and judging for the sake of those entrusted to me. I don't share your confidence, not one bit.

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  14. Thanks Mr. Bear for giving us lots of stuff to chew over even if some don't like the taste of it. To me the whole point of blogging is to stir up controversy so that, hopefully, the truth will out. Keep up your good work.

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  15. Ches at the The Sensible Bond posted a helpful post-post-mortem as he steps back from the apocalyptic brink to recognize we "dodged a bullet" with this synod. And yet, like the Bear, he knows this was only one battle in an ongoing war that has been simmering for 50 years. The more open and intense battles provoked by Pope Francis are forcing more and more Catholics (lay and prelate) to wake up to the disastrous condition of the post-conciliar Church and our need to defend Her. The post at Sensible Bond: http://thesensiblebond.blogspot.com/2015/10/warring-metaphors.html

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  16. This is either naïve or self-assuring happy talk. This is no victory, but another step down the line. They'll take what they can get and strike again at another time.

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    Replies
    1. Marcel Ghost
      My position exactly.

      Here's a good summary from Michael Matt and John Rao. http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/fetzen-fliegen/item/2120-new-from-remnant-tv-synod-send-off-it-s-the-end-of-the-church-as-we-know-it

      Delete
  17. I'm curious. Given reality, what would YOU have considered a victory? So let's hear it. Oh, one rule: it must me ever so slightly acquainted with reality. Honestly, I'm curious. Are we really just arguing over the definition of "victory?"

    And why does everyone insist that it can't be a victory because they're not going to give up, but "use the language" to advance their schemes? Of COURSE they're going to "use the language" and everything else they can use, and OF COURSE they'll never give up. This is a war that will never end in time. But this was a victory in that war. I guess everyone has conveniently forgotten how many were wetting their pants about fundamental changes on homosexuality and divorce just weeks ago.

    I'm done. Bear out. It's like arguing with the voices in my head.

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    Replies
    1. A victory would be one or two,paragraphs that clearly, succinctly and powerfully re-presented Catholic Dogmatic Truth as the merciful solution to the world's current family and sexual problems.

      A victory would have been a laser beam of Truth that cannot be twisted. Defeat is a word storm of obfuscation full of puzzling phrases, outright novelties and theological deviations that CAN be twisted by motivated men.

      Delete
    2. Sorry to continue. Yes, it is not as bad as it could have been. Yep. I'll grant that. First, it's not over--Francis will have his say. Second, the process and product are terrible. Apparently, we may have an ongoing synodal process which lets the dissenters inch by inch change Catholic teaching--effectively if not literally. This is a terrible precedent and process to leave in place. The whole synod was pointless if it was intended to promote Catholic teaching. That was the last thing on the mind of those who wanted the synod to occur. The point of having a synodal process is to step by step dismantle the Church. We lose a little bit each time.

      Delete
    3. The existence of synods is ipso facto defeat, therefore victory was impossible, short of the Church declaring the automatic excommunication of anyone who participates in a synod. Do you have a realistic condition for victory? If this were a baseball game -- not a season -- would you say Marx, Daneels, Kasper, Rosica, and Bergoglio won?

      Delete
    4. The synod was originally billed as supporting the family in the current times. Name one thing to support indissoluble marriage, openness to life, raising kids in these times, encouraging cohabitators to marriage....among other things...I raised some in a post on my blog. The synod was at best a waste of time. It provided nothing of value for believing Catholics who are trying to live holy married lives and raise holy kids with the culture pushing up against them every moment of every day.

      I am sorry to be among those causing frustration in the woodlands. I understand to an extent what you are saying.

      Pax

      Delete
  18. Well, let me borrow from Unam Sanctam Catholicam:

    "Though Synod I was a conservative "victory" and though Synod II did not incorporate the worst of the Kasperite heresy in its final document, we should not in any sense these Synods as successes. This 2014-2015 Synod on the Family was probably the most disastrous thing that has happened to the Church since Vatican II. It will take centuries for the damage to be undone - and the damage is already done, regardless of what the final document says, because it has given the impression that fundamental moral doctrines are up for debate. And either way, we should remember that in Synod I, the majority of bishops voted for the pro-homosexual passages; they were not included because the vote did not reach the requisite 2/3, but it did reach a simple majority. This should appall us. Similarly, the fact that one conservative commentator estimated that at Synod II not more than 35% of the episcopate would vote for the Kasper thesis should horrify us. for these numbers mean that between 1/3 and 1/2 of our global episcopate lacks the most basic understanding of Catholic moral theology. Our pastors."

    http://unamsanctamcatholicam.blogspot.com/2015/10/synod-ii-wrap-up.html

    I thought throughout the past year since Synod I started that this entire thing in itself was bad news for the reasons just stated. So a victory would have been calling this entire charade off and coming clean with their intentions.

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    Replies
    1. So "calling the whole thing off" is your idea of victory? I see the problem at once.

      Delete
    2. The fact that a Synod can be called and the possibility seemingly raised that doctrine and/or pastoral practice related to doctrine could 'change' is a scandal in itself.

      Delete
  19. Mr. Bear. Here is the language that should be used to describe the meaning of the Synod.
    http://www.cfnews.org/page88/files/349e0bbd1fdfb6b7ec630d89a662d0fb-483.html

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  20. It is not a final victory...yes, there will continue to be challenges and threats. There always were and will be until Jesus' Second Coming. We can never rest or get complacent. Yet, considering what could have happened...it didn't. We have been given an opportunity to see just what our bishops and cardinals believe and think - a tremendous gift. And we as the laity can now decide how we are going to behave - like the adopted sons and daughters we are or we will give in to fear as if Christ had never come. Give thanks to God, gird your loins through Scripture and Eucharist, forsake sin and go out and do some works of mercy. We are being tested every bit as much as the princes of the Church are....God is looking closely at all of us.

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    Replies
    1. And I hate the idea that our bishops who stood up to the Bergoglio cabal will see nothing but griping about a hard-won victory, should they bother to read the Catholic citizen press. Fortunately, I think we've marginalized ourselves to the point no one is paying attention.

      Delete
  21. Bear, don't go into hibernation. You are so right--look at the smorgasbord of depravity on the table just weeks ago! The battle goes on, yes, but a few cool, shrewd and analytical heads share your take. Mundabor and Deus Ex Machina are brilliant in this regard. You are not alone!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks SP, although my head's not so cool now. So little actually changed content-wise, but the woodlands are a far different place now. I have an idea, but don't care to share without further reflection.

      Delete
  22. Who would have thought that trade and the Advocate would agree LOL Not a major win, but plenty to work with (unless I'm mistaken and trads believe the Kasper cabal actually won! -- that would put them out-Advocating the Advocate! :-)

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  23. Dear Bear,

    Selfish request--please, I am hanging on by a thread, and one of the few things keeping me from turning away from a Church that I was so in love with because it was the truth, whether I liked it or not, is your blog--it helps me know I am not the only one. A few weeks ago I meant to reply to an article you wrote wherein you stated something to the effect of "you were not sure what, or for whom, I am writing this article" and I wanted to say FOR ME, and thank you. But I have not had the opportunity until now.
    It is so late and I am very tired, and I am not making myself very clear above, but please know I am most grateful for your blog.

    Oremus Pro Invicem

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! Some days it seems the only thing I have to look forward to is arguing with people. My interest in the blog has pretty much flat-lined. The more I try not to cause scandal, the less fun it is. But, thanks again.

      Delete
    2. Theanter: If I might suggest you confide these emotions to our Lady--as I'm sure already do. The Catholic Faith has never changed and will never. There have always been bad Bishops. At this point in history they are within the Church, causing confusion. In the past entire nations, led by their bishops, have fallen from the Faith. However, there are also very good priests, and even some good bishops. Maybe God will even bless us with a good Pope some day.
      It's really the glory of a Catholic to maintain his communion with the supreme pontiff. It's always better than the alternative. Or, do you disagree? If so, grow your beard and join a schismatical sect.
      In response to the current problems, let us pray, fast, give alms and mortify, as per our Lady's directions.

      Delete
    3. I'm a girl! I cannot grow a beard even if I were to be en vougue and declare myself a non-surgically altered male today!

      Anyhow, yes there are of course some good Priests-- it is just that when I see how infected the Church is by people like this:
      http://www.churchauthority.org/blueprint/pope.asp (you can almost verbatim pull some of this from the Pope's speeches) and this: http://www.wijngaardsinstitute.com/who-we-are/ (they just signed the 'academics' letter to the editor to hate on Ross Douthat) so anyhow, when you look at the scope of infection in the Church and the laity and realize that it will not come back to the truth until after you are gone, it is a bit depressing.

      Delete
  24. Mr Bear.

    The bad guys are winning and have been for 50 years or more. They win by not articulating the doctrine of the Catholic Church in a clear way. By using confusing language. By "pastoral" concern, e.g., approve sinning via telling folks to follow their conscience. By not talking about sin, salvation, eternal life, confession, etc. By redirecting focus "social justice" and other Cultural Marxist concerns. These pastors are very smart. Smart as the devil. Answer to all of this: prayer, penance, resistance.

    Keep up your good work!

    ReplyDelete

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