Thursday, January 28, 2016

Vatican-- Be Thankful for Luther's "Spiritual Insights" and "Gifts of the Reformation"

"Sorry, I forgot who you are, but
whoever you are, you don't need the Catholic Church."
We've seen the photo op with Cardinal Koch and Rabbi -- oh, wait that was the last photo op. Cardinal Koch loves nothing better to get his picture taken with people who aren't Catholic.

Anyway, the Bear thought you might want to read the document jointly held by Cardinal Koch and some Lutheran guy.

Its name is "Common Prayer, From Conflict to Communion, Lutheran-Catholic Common Commemoration of the Reformation in 2017."

It was written by the "Liturgical Task Force on Lutheran-Roman Catholic Commission on Unity."

The Bear has not thoroughly read it yet [NOTE: see below] but thought he would get it out there. It is available at Lutheran World. Download link to get the PDF. If it is posted on the Vatican website, the Bear missed it, but everybody knows how slipshod the Bear's research is.

It's actually the whole thing, with the rubrics and text, so you can gather your Lutheran friends and hold your own commemoration. Just like the Pope in Sweden.

So until the Bear has the time to study it, you are welcome to draw your own conclusions.

UPDATE: The Bear is going through this and cannot believe that the Roman Catholic Church is trying to foist this miserable deception off on the long suffering faithful. No Catholic could possibly participate in this abomination. The Bear won't rant, though, because it speaks for itself.

"Help us to rejoice in the gifts that have come to the church through the Reformation."

"Martin Luther and the other reformers only sought to be "witnesses for Christ."

"Lutherans are thankful in their hearts for what Luther and the other reformers made accessible to them: the understanding of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and faith in Him."

"The ecumenical journey enables Lutherans and Catholics to appreciate Martin Luther's insight into and spiritual experience of the Gospel."


"Thanks be to you O God for the many guiding theological and spiritual insights that we have all received through the Reformation. Thanks be to you for the good transformations and reforms that were set in motion by the Reformation or by struggling with its challenges. Thanks be to you for the proclamation of the gospel that occurred during the Reformation and that since then has strengthened countless people to live lives of faith in Jesus Christ."


"We confess our own ways of thinking and acting that perpetuate the divisions of the past. As communities and as individuals, we build many walls around us: mental, spiritual, physical, political walls that result in discrimination and violence. Forgive us, Lord." (There are multiple confessions of guilt and mutual abuse through history.)

[Sharing the sign of peace while "Ubi Caritas" is sung.]


The Five Commitments

1. Our first commitment: Catholics and Lutherans should always begin from the perspective of unity and not from the point of view of division in order to strengthen what is held in common even though the differences are more easily seen and experienced.

2. Our second commitment: Lutherans and Catholics must let themselves continuously be transformed by the encounter with the other and by the mutual witness of faith.


3. Our third commitment: Catholics and Lutherans should again commit themselves to seek visible unity, to elaborate together what this means in concrete steps, and to strive repeatedly toward this goal.  


4. Our fourth commitment: Lutherans and Catholics should jointly rediscover the power of the gospel of Jesus Christ for our time. 


5. Our fifth commitment: Catholics and Lutherans should witness together to the mercy of God in proclamation and service to the world. 

(During the Five Commitments, children, especially from "ecumenical marriages" between Lutherans and Catholics, light candles.)


The Take Away

Catholics must acknowledge their debt to Luther for his spiritual insights, and recognize the gifts the Reformation brought to the Church. It isn't clear what Lutherans are giving up in return, other than saying that some of the rhetoric during the 16th century went too far. The Church and Lutherans are both branches on the one Vine, Christ. The goal is "visible unity," whatever form that might take.

Need the Bear point out the disastrous implications for the Church's coherent understanding of just what the Church is? If it was never clear before, it is now clear that for our sorry collection of leaders, the Church came into being in 1965. Anything before that has only slight, provisional value, if it is remembered at all.

13 comments:

  1. The Church has always had her Saints and her Sinners, those who teach her truths and those who distort her treasures. Like any leadership roles we have the good and not so good, those who do justice to their calling and those who bring digrace to their office. Good and evil is not a good team, we can't wait for the others demise, the Church waits with the rest of the world for a conclusion to this battle. The last act might be brawl like no other as we fight for victory.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Here is the sick and twisted Luther in his own words. See Ann Barnhardt
    http://www.barnhardt.biz/2016/01/26/luther-in-his-own-words/

    I look upon God no better than a scoundrel”
    (ref. Weimar, Vol. 1, Pg. 487. Cf. Table Talk, No. 963).
    –**–
    “Christ committed adultery first of all with the women at the well about whom St. John tells us. Was not everybody about Him saying: ‘Whatever has He been doing with her?’ Secondly, with Mary Magdalen, and thirdly with the women taken in adultery whom He dismissed so lightly. Thus even, Christ who was so righteous, must have been guilty of fornication before He died.”
    (ref. Trishreden, Weimer Edition, Vol. 2, Pg. 107. – What a great blasphemy from a man who is regarded as “great reformer”!).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But it goes with his theology. Sin doesn't count, so he blasphemes to reinforce is error. But remember, this is one of the spiritual insights of the newest Doctor of the Church, Martin Luther, that Francis demands we be thankful for.

      Delete
    2. The saddest part is that most Lutherans don't actually k ow the teachings of their founding heresiarch.

      Lord have mercy.

      Delete
    3. The saddest part is that most Lutherans don't actually k ow the teachings of their founding heresiarch.

      Lord have mercy.

      Delete
    4. I agree. Luther has been so whitewashed by the Protestants over the years that most of them have no idea what he actually said or wrote. Or they're aggressively defensive. On another forum, I actually saw a Lutheran post that it really didn't matter what Luther thought, because he was simply the one who had opened the door to Protestantism after the millennium and a half of the "First Century Apostasy." Oddly enough, Protestants never look into the others they claim as forebears, including some of the most appalling and licentious heresies on the books (look at the Carthari, for starters).

      Delete
    5. Historical ignorance is partly excusable, but incoherence is another matter.

      Delete
  3. And I thought this one was quite the contortionist's trick:

    "What affects one member of the body also affects all the others. For this reason, when Lutheran Christians remember the events that led to the particular formation of their churches, they do not wish to do so without their Catholic fellow Christians. In remembering with each other the beginning of the Reformation, they are taking their baptism seriously.”

    That a successor of Peter would be party to this grotesque event is unimaginable. As in, you can't make this stuff up -- and only a sick or evil mind would try.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good catch, Jane. How can the Pope claim that his Church and Lutheran heretics are two equal branches on the one vine? Or praise Luther for his "spiritual insights?" Or thank heretics for the "gifts of the Reformation?"

    At this point Bear is just pretending JB is Pope because, well just because. Too messy otherwise. But whatever he is he needs to send Cardinal Koch to the Arctic to count polar bears and withdraw this evil document. He can still go to Sweden if he must, but not participate in this.

    Anyone else notice how massive departures from Church teaching are coming out under some commission, under the radar as it were? This is no accident. Same with Cardinal Koch's New Jew View. He would sell Christ himself for a photo op with a leader of a non-Catholic faith.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The question has been asked: When will a Bishop rise up who will forsake his mitre and his vestments and even the condemnation of a vindictive man and take this Pope to task, resisting him to the face for the cause of Christ?

    To which the current progressives respond:

    "That is exactly what Luther said".

    Now we know it was Luther's intent to introduce novel teaching, and neither did Luther have the support of the perennial teaching of the Church to back him up, but that of course doesn't matter.

    Now think of the math here; There is no way the Pope can be taken to task in any normal fashion because the numbers are too great in his favor. So "math" and the laws of predictability do not work in favor of the truth of Christ. We are without shepherds. We are alone in the face of great evil. But we are NOT. God is on our side, a statement that is of course highly unpopular to suggest, but true it is.

    I get a certain sense that I am sitting in a great amphitheater, waiting for a miracle to occur before my eyes. For it is without any form of human and natural "hope" we can rely at this point. The defense of the faith must now come from a great work of God Himself.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The question has been asked: When will a Bishop rise up who will forsake his mitre and his vestments and even the condemnation of a vindictive man and take this Pope to task, resisting him to the face for the cause of Christ?

    To which the current progressives respond:

    "That is exactly what Luther said".

    Now we know it was Luther's intent to introduce novel teaching, and neither did Luther have the support of the perennial teaching of the Church to back him up, but that of course doesn't matter.

    Now think of the math here; There is no way the Pope can be taken to task in any normal fashion because the numbers are too great in his favor. So "math" and the laws of predictability do not work in favor of the truth of Christ. We are without shepherds. We are alone in the face of great evil. But we are NOT. God is on our side, a statement that is of course highly unpopular to suggest, but true it is.

    I get a certain sense that I am sitting in a great amphitheater, waiting for a miracle to occur before my eyes. For it is without any form of human and natural "hope" we can rely at this point. The defense of the faith must now come from a great work of God Himself.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is sad that Martin Luther, a fornicator, an adulterer, and a fallen priest, has been elevated to forgiveness and reconciliation... eternity is forever; thank God, JB's influence will be short lived!

    ReplyDelete
  8. (With apologies to Belloc)

    Noel, Noel, Noel, Noel
    All Lutherans end up in Hell

    ReplyDelete

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