Saturday, August 13, 2016

Judging Angels Cover Art Official

The Bear's own design for his - er, Tim Capps' - novel Judging Angels is official. (The Bear is a dab hand with the Photoshop, and his in-house art department is even better.) View it on Capps' author page here, and take a look at his obviously padded resume while you're there.

13 comments:

  1. A fascinating curriculum vitae. A life well lived. Talents fully expressed. When the Master comes for the reckoning, I hope he will say "Well Done!" to you.

    All the best in your newest, interesting venture!

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    1. Thanks. And thanks for the flying lessons.

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  2. Looking forward to the release of your first novel.

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    1. That makes two of us, anyway!

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    2. Me three! I just hope I can comprehend the story lines because from your vitae, you sound smarter than I thought.
      (& I will pay extra for a pawtograph please)

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    3. Autographs no extra! Yes. When I read that I sounded smarter than I though, too.

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  3. It didn't seem so interesting at the time. But thanks.

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    1. I can think of fewer nobler, more interesting things to do than defend the life of those facing the ultimate penalty; to apply the mercy of our Faith and the full protections of law well understood to the twisted, broken lives of those whose initial opportunities and promise is all but ended. Hope! A nice construct of your chosen profession. And an excellent way to plant Gospel seeds where they may otherwise have never found purchase.

      I'm looking forward to the Novel to see what that's all about.

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    2. Thank you. One of my colleagues told the press he saw the face of Christ in Chris Coleman, certainly the worst case I ever participated in. He is Catholic. Needless to say, he was pilloried. But it's true. Death penalty defense is something no one can really get from the outside, simply because you are never forced to confront the accused murderer. He is just some abstract concept in whatever notion you may have of criminal justice, or the object of a visceral reaction to a horrible crime. But murderers are not slavering villains without souls, or fear, or hopes, or moms, or old report cards in a drawer somewhere. They have done a horrible thing. They are persons who have done a horrible thing. The Bear is not aware that the Church has ever taught one ceases to have a soul when one commits murders, or ceases to be a creature in the image of God. So, yes. I see the face of Christ in everyone (or try to; as a Bear it is very hard when I want to rip someone's jaw off). I guess anyone who is perfect, though, and has never committed a mortal sin, would have the right to criticize my position, however.

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    3. Every immortal human soul comes directly from the Mind of God; is sustained by the benevolence and grace of God. God loves that murderer infinitely. God loves them more than Satan hates them. Every single one of us deserves hell. Forever. Only God's grace and love beyond human reckoning opens a path to salvation for His "Elect".

      That accused, sitting across the table, is doomed without Jesus. He is doomed very SOON if you don't win the case. But then again, I ALSO am doomed. Perhaps very soon, when I drive home tonight. BUT FOR THE GRACE OF GOD!

      God wants that accused soul in Paradise. I do too. Those who have been forgiven much can more easily empathize with the accused and rejected.

      You have a career that can deliver him now and possibly in the hereafter. That is honorable.

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  4. Given your death penalty legal work, curious how you feel about the two upcoming Texas executions where neither man directly murdered someone.

    (When I read about this, it was the death penalty part that really bothered me, not the fact they were convicted as they do bear considerable responsibility for their involvement. I guess I wasn't aware we execute persons that did not directly murder someone.)

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    1. In Illinois one could not get the dp on accountability. You had inflict some contemporaneous injury to the victim, who was killed by somebody else. Dp varies from state to state. Texas has very little to be proud of in its system, unless they have instituted the kind of reforms and protections Illinois put in place in the years leading up to abolition.

      The bottom line is if we have dp, we are going to execute a few innocent people. People overrate the whole system's infallibility. We know people confess falsely to murder, and we know why (dangerous interrogation techniques taught to every jurisdiction int the country by Reid out of Chicago). We know eyewitness testimony can be very unreliable, especially cross-racial. There are many social science studies that demonstrate this. We know police and prosecutors have suppressed evidence favorable to the accused and cheated to convict innocent people, e.g. Rolando Cruz in DuPage County, Illinois.

      Texas is the only state I know of that executed a man who is now considered to have been innocent. He was convicted on the testimony of a so-called expert in arson. The science he supposedly used has since been completely discredited.

      SCOTUS has excluded certain defendants or crimes from the dp. Rape, for instance, and now we cannot execute retarded defendants. Accountability has been challenged, I'm sure.

      Now, I am not a big fan of SCOTUS interfering with how states want to handle their death penalty, either. I do think it is a matter that should be left up to the states.

      Illinois handled ours very well. We recognized the problem of actual innocence, we put a moratorium on executions, we put in place simple, but effective safeguards like requiring interrogations to be videotaped in homicide investigations, we created a panel of the very best and most experienced criminal lawyers (less than 1% ) and certified them to handle dps (I was on the selection panel) and we also set aside a lot of money for these cases.

      I was the best value in the state, I learned later, with most lawyers billing 10x as much, and one billing 1.5 million on a single case. That was the only time I can remember feeling like a putz for being ethical.

      I remember when I got a call at my office from a justice on the Illinois Supreme Court. I was like, "oh, crap, I must REALLY be in trouble!" But no, he asked me to be on the panel selection committee. I was very honored.

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