Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Pope TED

Everybody loves to hate TED talks. It is an official entry on the "Stuff White People Like" website. Comedian Sam Hyde was spot on when he gave a ridiculously self-congratulatory TED talk on "the 2070 Paradigm Shift" a few years ago, while dressed like a Greek hoplite.

With his "Neo-Earth Good Government League" he should have been the warm-up act for Francis' TED talk.

 Among the gems (this is Sam Hyde):

What inspires me, is teaching African refugees how to program Javascript. What inspires me is finding out how to use MagLev trains to get resources to the moon. These are the challenges that tomorrow's going to face.

It should be no surprise that Pope Francis popped up on a TED to talk about the "Future You."

The Bear finds that phrase ominous, since, actuarially, the future Bear will shortly be fertilizing the daisy patch. But, of course, the future is full of hope for Pope Francis. But what kind of hope?

As the Bear read the bland comments, he recalled the brilliant po-mo generator that assembles jargon into academic essays that have fooled at least one journal. It would not be hard to create a "Francis Generator" that did a quick paste job using solidarity, refugees, migrants, youth, arms dealers, dialogue, and those evil northern bastards who stole everything from the south, etc.

This talk could have been generated by the Bear's hypothetical program. And it is just as hard to write a sensible story about. You can skim it for yourself. It isn't that long. It is devoid of any genuine Catholic insights. The theological virtue of Hope is reduced to an expectation for a better tomorrow - here on earth. Pope Francis actually calls for a revolution. A worldly revolution, of course, that would put in power progressives like himself.

It makes an uncomfortable read, because you realize that this is not someone who is all that interested in souls, or Heaven, or any of that stuff. Jorge Bergoglio was elected Pope to advance the agenda of the Prince of This World. His gospel is the anti-gospel of the Prince of This World.

The Bear will pull one comment for analysis, though.

If there is one parable that is the most abused, it is the Parable of the Good Samaritan. Your Pope makes it sound like it is being declaimed by Lenin while the Internationale plays in the background.

The story of the Good Samaritan is the story of today’s humanity. People's paths are riddled with suffering, as everything is centered around money, and things, instead of people. And often there is this habit, by people who call themselves "respectable," of not taking care of the others,

So far, so not too awful. There are many who put caring for another person far down on the list. Especially rich bastards, but, still, this isn't so bad. But then here's the sting.


thus leaving behind thousands of human beings, or entire populations, on the side of the road. Fortunately, there are also those who are creating a new world by taking care of the other, even out of their own pockets.



"Thousands of human beings." "Entire populations, on the side of the road." But, hey, those who support my immigration policy are "creating a new world." Heaven on earth. You would think his Bible had "The Parable of Redistributing Wealth to Entire Populations By the Side of the Road." If his papacy lasts long enough, yours will, too.

The Bear will let you judge for yourself whether Pope TED has a clue about what the Parable of the Good Samaritan means. But here's a hint: forbid any Marxist interpretation and he would be left stammering.

14 comments:

  1. One phrase that also strikes me as odd is "taking care of the other, even out of their own pockets." It sounds as though he expects most of those creating a new world will use money from other people's pockets. Which I suspect he does.

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  2. The TED talk of his I read was about being humble. Was that the same one? Talk about irony. For him to talk about the responsibility to be humble if you are indeed powerful! Oh buh-rother.

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  3. Ah, visitors! Come in, come in! Let the Bear brew some tea for you. Sit anywhere you like. He thinks there's some honey around here somewhere.

    It probably did have something about humility... but the main thrust was the future, and how we need to use science to find habitable people orbiting around us and killing all the rich people and taking their stuff. The Bear dozed off a couple of times, so he may not be 100% about the last thing.

    "Out of their own pockets" is great if it means good people who are dipping into their own resources to help an individual in need. But the problem with Francis is, he can't resist giving a Marxist flavor to everything.

    The Bear wants a Pope who talks about his soul, and he wants him RIGHT NOW RAWR!

    The TED talk Bear is talking about is linked to.

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  4. It's a trendy on-going series of talks by all sorts of different future meant to educate and inspire us about present issues and our glorious future. It has pretty much been a joke for a long time.

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  5. Oh dear, His Humbleness talked again?,

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  6. Props for being referenced by Ms. Barnhardt in her inaugural podcast!

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  7. Ann Barnhardt with a minigun on the back of the Bear. All problems solved except how not to be too happy. The Bear wonders if I can get everyone to refer to the Bear as "The Bear Who Wrote the Dubious New Novel, Judging Angels?" Yeah, the Bear knows flogging a novel isn't popular, but a Bear's got to eat, buy goat chow and chicken feel. He'll try to keep it to a minimum, but when it gets released the next couple of days (he hopes) there will be a blip.

    Do you know any Romanian... er, Alphabet?

    ReplyDelete
  8. That is a marvelous scene to imagine. But is there a large enough set of BDUs for the Bear to wear into combat? Oh, wait...Bear doesn't wear man-clothes. How about at least a nice helmet to protect his noble head while Ann mows down the heretics?

    ReplyDelete
  9. On Good Friday, I did participated in the Way of the Cross in one of the poorest neighborhoods in my city. One thing that always strikes me when encountering many of these people, is that they respond more to the spiritual hope you can give them, than any material hope.

    Which got me to thinking, I could do a similar walk in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in my city passing out Miraculous Medals and praying for strangers in the hospital, but I would be met with much more resistance.

    I suppose my point is that there is a whole swath of people in the developed world that are lying in the ditch on the road to Jericho and it is not limited to just one class of people. After reverting back to the faith, I realized that I was the one left for dead on the road and that Jesus is the man that tended to my wounds. I am reminded of a prayer of St. Jerome's which includes the line "I am like the man on the road to Jericho, wounded and left for dead, O Good Samaritan come to my aid."

    Of course most Catholics and Protestants treat this story as a means of helping out people in need (aka the immigrant and refugee, and in 50 years I'm sure it will be some other class), instead of seeing it as a call to heal people of their spiritual wounds. So we get bishops like Cupich, Tobin and Farrell elevated despite how they leave the stranger dying on the side of the road.

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  10. The "Francis Generator" should also include the words "rigid", "doctors of the law" and "Pelagians", as well as quite a few Spanish cuss words, apparently.

    The potty-mouth Pontiff loves to trash talk and ridicule those who embrace Catholic tradition.

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