Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Internet Porn a Gift from God?

Since internet users spend an average of 27 seconds on any given site the Bear has to get you into the tent. NEW POPE VIDEO AND PORN!

Pope Francis as Bad Example


Pope Francis is, with all due respect, an excellent example of someone who is unwisely trying to use media with extremely poor truth-transmitting capacities to teach the faith. Off-the-cuff pressers on airplanes? God, no, please. Feel-good lifestyle comments to anyone who manages to get near him? A pope can't be a glad-handing Tammany Hall wannabe like Cardinal Dolan because, hey, he's just a nice guy and wanna be liked.

And there are these damned Pope Videos.

The latest calls the internet "a gift from God," and shows how wonderful social networks are supposed to be. Even Africans with dirt floors have Wi-Fi, apparently. Let's just keep it "inclusive," 'kay? That's right. The only warning the Pope gives about the internet is that we keep it "inclusive."


Dumb PSA: Papal Service Announcement

What can you say about these dumb Public Service Announcements from the Pope. Here is the Vicar of Christ using his teaching authority (apparently) to raise awareness of global warming, care for the planet, indifferentism, and all sorts of things, so long as they don't challenge the zeitgeist. Catholic content: zero.

The Pope Videos are a metaphor for how media not only limits, but shapes content. The Christian religion is reduced to another TV commercial that might have been produced by the Democrat National Committee or Greenpeace.

And, typically, whoever created this particular abomination about the internet deals only with content, not the problems with the medium itself. In other words, They Don't Get It. But, we knew that all along.


Pornography and Sex

Almost no one is using this "gift from God" to watch Pope Videos, though. They're all watching porn. (James Martin S.J. probably isn't, because he's too busy being an idiot on Twitter.)

That's right. According to an article on the Forbes website, 2.5% of all the internet users in the world are finding some sort of god at just one adult site: Live Jasmin, which is interactive. You not only watch,  but tell the girls what you want to see! Internet porn stats are notoriously difficult to pin down, but it's safe to say this gift from God is leading a lot more people to Live Jasmin than Pope Francis. (If you fell for the Bear trick, don't feel bad. We're all human. Except the Bear.)

Given the awful Pope Videos, Bear is not sure that's a bad thing. But, hey, the Bear would pay $1.99 a minute if they were interactive to tell the Pope to just stop, but if he wants to talk about the internet, talk about how it's making us all stupid and wicked, not about content and how it's all good as long as we're "inclusive" whatever the Hell that's code for.

But what is porn doing to humans? Let the Bear introduce you to:


The Coolidge Effect

The name comes from a story, or a joke. President Coolidge's wife was at a government farm and noticed a rooster mating several times. Upon asking, she was told, yes, it was the same rooster, and he did that all the time. "Tell the President when he comes by," she told the attendant. When it was the President's turn, he was informed as the missus had asked. "Same hen?" Silent Cal asked. "Oh, no, sir, they're all different hens." So Coolidge answered: "Tell that to Mrs. Coolidge."

Scientists (don't ask Bear why) experimented with mice and found that boy mice were capable of heroic sexual activity as long as they were provided new partners. Mrs. Mouse? Let's just say he did his duty.


Your Brain on Porn

What's that got to do with the internet? The brains of the people who use internet porn don't know they're not, um, interacting with new and exciting real partners. Enter the Coolidge Effect. Variety is the hardwired spice of life, which for thousands of years we didn't need experiments with mice to know. Just ask David. Or Solomon, who had like a billion mice.

Porn changes the human brain. But, then, everything you do much of online does.

A gift from God, huh? If so, it's the Bear doing God's work with it, not the Pope.

Here's an illustration of the Coolidge Effect from Stanley Kubrick's hilarious Dr. Strangelove (1964). Watch George C. Scott's reaction to the plan for repopulating the United States and the question and answer starting 55 seconds in.



13 comments:

  1. "...produced by the Democrat National Committee or Greenpeace"

    Err, I don't think so. The DNC / Greenpeace would have put out something with much better production value.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Small favors. At least the Pope doesn't have that creepy teleprompter reflection in his glasses anymore. This one was sort of slick, with little chat balloons. Of all the things to say about the internet, keep it "inclusive" is just plugging in a random politically correct buzzword.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "capable of heroic sexual activity as long as they were provided new partners."

    Once again, thoughts of Dr. Strangelove are stirred up.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your Coolidge effect is sorta interesting, I guess. And, as an educated Biologist and long time Engineer, the science sounds logical and right.

    But, so what really?

    Men have it tough. Boys / Adolescence the same. You cannot even look at a magazine rack while standing in line at the local supermarket without being bombarded with un chaste images.

    I'm an old man now of 58. But, I still have challenges for custody of the eyes. What are males to do? Live a sacramental life. Frequent confession and worth reception of the Eucharist. Speaking for myself, I know I've received a great many graces in this are thru the Holy Mother's help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The "so what" is that while custody of the eyes is difficult and important (the Bear has written even of "Weapons of Mass Distraction" in church) the internet changes everything. If people think, "Oh, well, there have always been challenges, so the internet is nothing new," the Bear could tell you some stories.

      He has done federal cases where men have had collections of child pornography consisting of tens of thousands of images or videos. And, of course, the Bear had to look at every damned one of the things to determine whether it was a child, and whether it was pornography. (The answer was yeah.)

      But, let's consider regular pornography. The internet mainlines it. Click, click, click, whatever you want. New neural pathways are formed. A normal sex life can't compete. It's like the mice in the Coolidge Effect experiments. While this involves content, it still gets back to the medium itself. Once again, the new ways we have to use information are applied to old content with alarming results. The internet is not like a magazine or a stag film or a porn video. It is its own new thing with dangers the Bear wants everyone to understand.

      Delete
    2. I'm deeply sorry you had to view those things. There will be images seared in the mind which can be brought back up with a passing thought. I once heard a priest say that God grants them a Mercy to forget what they hear in confession. Perhaps if you go to an exorcist he could drive them out.

      Delete
    3. I suppose it falls into the "You knew the job was dangerous when you took it" category. To be honest, though, I cannot bring a single image to conscious light. I think one advantage of having to view so very many is that they all become a blur. Also, a criminal defense lawyer develops the trick early on to avoid emotional engagement with evidence.

      Even murder scene and autopsy photos are hard to recall, with very few exceptions. You get to where you examine them with a sandwich in your hand. Personally, an autopsy evoked awe at how "fearfully and wonderfully made" by God we are. Humans are pretty remarkable inside, even when they're dead.

      Then again, maybe that's just a Bear thing.

      Delete
    4. Bear - My "So what" comment was not intended to be harsh. I was trying to express that the science if interesting but sorta irrelevant to the sin.
      I am very aware of how images and music affects me. I had a very difficult time with my now adult son with some of the terrible music videos of 10 years ago. They had a very bad effect on him. So, I cannot imagine your work with the child pron.

      Delete
    5. No, I didn't take it that way and apologize if my answer seemed abrupt. To be honest, I failed to take into account that you were singing from a slightly different hymnal. That's my fault. I am focusing on particular things in this series, and while they can certainly relate to sin, it's mainly about the medium itself.

      They say you never forget anything. I don't know if that's true. Maybe I have 50,000 images of kiddie porn buried deep somewhere in my subconscious. I'd rather have them there than bubbling up. I think I would be really worried if I DID remember them. I totally get murder. I mean, I can understand how it happens, and, under the wrong circumstances, who knows? If you can get angry, you can murder. Jesus seemed to think so, anyway.

      Child pornography is the one crime I didn't get. I has some relation to sex, but kids? I never felt a connection, although I discovered some things common to offenders. I don't think anyone wakes up one day and says, "Hey, I think I'll try some kiddie porn." These are men with issues that go way back, for the most part. I think it's the same with abusers. It's awful, and those were cases I hated to do.

      When I went into criminal defense, I promised myself that I would never turn away a person accused by the government of a crime. I never declined to represent someone on the basis of their allegations. Sort of a code.

      Delete
  5. I always thought that the closing song of that movie was a strange choice but a good one. It's not as terrifying of an ending as "On the Beach".

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    Replies
    1. It's a dark comedy, of course. The melancholy, romantic signature song by English singer Vera Lynn recalls her WWII popularity, I think. It's pretty clear nobody's meeting anyone again, unlike after WWII. Vera Lynn is also referenced on Pink FLoyd's The Wall, which heavily references WWII. "Does anybody here remember Vera Lynn? Remember how she said that we would meet again some sunny day?" Astonishingly, Vera Lynn is still alive at the age of 101!

      Delete
  6. Bear will say his spam comments have taken a different turn since this article. Speaking of spam comments, you don't see them. But the fractured English and effusive (if generic) praise often gives the Bear a chuckle before he deletes them.

    ReplyDelete

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