Monday, July 9, 2018

A Message from the Bear's Attorney

I am Timothy Capps, Esq., the attorney and "human agent" for the writer of this blog, St. Corbinian's Bear. It came to my attention that this blog has been neglected and I made diligent inquiries regarding the Bear. It is my duty to inform any remaining readers that I have been unable to locate the Bear and can provide no information at this time regarding his intentions toward this blog.

The Bear had instructed me a couple of years ago to do as I saw fit with this blog in the event of a lengthy, unexplained absence. In all likelihood, I will put this blog and the (for want of a better term) "Bear brand" in mothballs, possibly offering the few remaining die-hard readers the opportunity to migrate to a different blog reflecting my own interests and style. I will do so only if I believe I would do no disservice to his loyal friends or his spirit of intelligent and forthright inquiry.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the readers and supporters of this blog. I know that your friendship meant much to the Bear.

I would like to clear up any confusion that may have been inadvertently created regarding authorship of the novel Judging Angels and Saint Corbinian's Bear Lenten Companion for Bearish Humans. Certainly, the Bear provided kind assistance in these works, and lent his name and fictionalized history to the one. However, I was the sole author of Judging Angels and co-authored the Lenten Companion with my wife, Kathryn.

I also wish to make it clear that the Bear, shall we say, took artistic license by incorporating alleged elements of my own life's story in his articles. I even tolerated the appropriation of my wife's identity in the thinly-veiled character of "Red Death." Readers will understand, of course, that our talented ursine friend used many devices to relate to his human readers.

In other words, I am me and the Bear is the Bear. I'm sure we all wish him the best, wherever he is.

23 comments:

  1. Bear, I will miss you. Good luck on future Bearish endeavors and adventures. I feel very fortunate that you allowed us along for the ride.

    Mr. Capps, if you decide to author a blog, you have a reader here. Best wishes to you and your wife.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am fortunate to have readers who contributed to the playful spirit of this blog for a pretty good run through interesting times. There will be a new blog called Red Locks & Black Feathers that will be less ambitious and maybe have a little more about writing. Although as of this post there is no content, you can bookmark it before you forget at
      conspiracyofcrows.blogspot.com

      Delete
  2. Ginger Rogers is WAY over rated.

    ReplyDelete
  3. And yet.....

    Never give up prayer, and should you find dryness and difficulty, persevere in it for this very reason. God often desires to see what love your soul has, and love is not tried by ease and satisfaction.
    John of the Cross

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  4. I will miss the Bear! Many thanks for all the wonderful stories and thoughtful meanderings! God bless you Bear!

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  5. May you and Katherine continue your collaborations as the wonderful humans who shared their woodland adventures as SC Bear and Red Death with us.

    Seriously, you wrote at just the write/right time to wake me up to lots of things. Thank you thank you thank you...and Deo gratias!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much. I have enjoyed your loyal contributions to the discussion. See above response if you would like to bookmark the new blog. It won't be nearly as ambitious, but might be some fun.

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  6. I wish both of you the best, and am grateful for having enjoyed and learned from this blog.
    The Beaver

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Elizabeth. Having a group of loyal readers kept it fun for a long time, but every circus Bear knows all acts have an end and you don't want to drag it out. There will be another blog (the URL to bookmark is posted in a comment above, but there's nothing there yet).

      Delete
  7. 1) Life is short, I hope you do what you want.

    2) I enjoyed the Bear, both the Church controversy version and the blogging-is-bad version. Why not mothball Bear in case another war breaks out?

    3) Did the Internet-is-bad-for-the-Church-and-your-brain class run its course?

    4) You do seem to have made a bunch of sharp, inorganic turns in your blogging and book-writing professional life. But maybe that's just my impression.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I am still interested in those ideas and will probably pick away at the subject at conspiracyofcrows.blogspot.com when it gets set up. As for "sharp inorganic turns" I would say sharp, yes, but I'm not sure about "inorganic." I think one would have to know me very well to make that judgment.

      I wrote an ambitious first novel that got published by an independent publisher. My publisher went out of business, but that gave me the opportunity to address the flaws in it. I have edited it down from 158,000 words to 118,400 words and it is in the hands of an editor. My wife and I also wrote the Lenten Companion, of which I'm very proud, and that will become available, too.

      I don't consider myself a "professional" writer, but I am working very hard at being the best amateur I can be! I have struggled with the sequel and probably nuked the equivalent of Moby Dick in various drafts, but will not give up. My profession is being a retired lawyer who has led a very interesting life full of sharp turns.

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    2. Re Melville:

      "Moby Dick" did not begin to be widely appreciated until 26 years after Melville's death.

      Melville only had commercial success with his first book, a exaggerated travelogue about his time in the South Pacific. He was frustrated the rest of his life trying to recapture that success.

      He found his eldest child, an 18-year-old son, in his bedroom dead from an self-inflicted gunshot to the head.

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    3. That's sad. I never appreciated Moby Dick, to tell you the truth. About the only thing the sequel has in common with it is first person writing.

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  8. This crow shall miss the bear and rejoices in his loss of interest in pony snatching.

    And, to Tim, many thanks; my conversion sparked an online search for similar discernment and I found a man who aided my reception into the Church from lutheranism. This was officiatated last Easter (finally). I hope to read more of your works in the future.

    Grateful, eternally.

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    Replies
    1. That's wonderful news!

      I have received a lot of stories over the years that permit me to hope that the effort I put into a clownish Bear touched peoples lives in positive ways.

      I shall always remember you, because, oddly, your email address showed up for all post notices in my email!

      Delete
  9. In the shuffling madness
    Of the locomotive breath,
    Runs the all, time loser,
    Headlong to his death…

    Thanks for all the laughs, sure will miss SCB humor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You might find something to laugh at with the Crows. Who knows. I caught the Jethro Tull 50th anniversary tour recently. Ian Anderson is 70 years old and, frankly, I could have done better on the singing. It was bad. The flute playing was better than ever, though. What can I say? Bad and sad performance, but I had a great time with Red Death.

      I prefer to go out singing "Cheerio."

      Along the coast road, by the headland
      the early lights of winter glow.
      I'll pour a cup to you my darling.
      And raise it up say Cheerio.

      Delete
  10. Bear,
    Really enjoyed your blog. I enjoyed interacting with you and the other woodland creatures. I’ll miss you and the wonderful pictures and videos of the goats. I hope the new blog comes on line soon. And I wish you and Red Death the very best in life. Take care, bear. You’ll be missed.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, there will be pictures and goats and Ginger and all the usual stuff. It will just be chill. (I saw your greeting--thanks!)

      Delete
  11. Great Bear must be hibernating. It is unwise to seek the lair of a sleeping bear, even less to wake one, even accidentally.

    Owl's have shorter lives than bears, so it is likely that Owl and Bear will only see each other again when we reach that place where "the sun never rises"*, so give my best to Great Bear if you ever see him Mr. Capps. Thank him and let him know that he has done well.

    ~Owl

    *Owls, being creatures of twilight, sing of the future world not as something brightly lit by the sun, but of the dimly lit world where night is beautiful, redeemed and freed from that which lurks. "Day", where predators can get the sleeping owl, is banished and is no more. 'Fear the day, and the burning eye that never blinks,' is what we teach chicklings.

    Onward then. ~a flutter of wings

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  12. I hope some of the more distinguished woodland creatures will find there way to the new blog, if only to leave a greeting. I'll miss Owl, who is wise, as Owls tend to be.

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